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Showing posts from January, 2015

Review of John C. Lennox, "God’s undertaker: Has science buried God?" (2009)

This is the most compelling book I have read on the so-called Science vs Religion debate. Lennox thinks with striking sharpness about the issues he writes about. The whole book is closely argued, and Lennox sees the counterarguments and responds to them before—at least in my case—the reader has managed to formulate them. His main target is Richard Dawkins, leader of the New Atheists, and Lennox takes Dawkins’ arguments to pieces with razor-sharp reasoning. 
The review below was written in March 2014 for an informal book group. A Christian academic has two forms of commitment to truth. One is a commitment to what he believes as a Christian. The other is a commitment to what his research reveals. There can be only one truth, so the two forms of truth should line up with each other. If they don’t, then something has to change. In recent years this has not been a major challenge for me personally, but the issues that surround truth have long interested me because I have colleagues whose sys…

Review of Vishal Mangalwadi, "The book that made your world: How the Bible created the soul of Western civilization" (2011)

Mangalwadi is an Indian Christian, and this gives his book its unique perspective. Only someone who is not a Westerner could have written much of what he says about the West without being immediately accused of bias and political incorrectness. 

The book's scope is immense. M’s basic theme is that just about everything that is good about Western society is a result of the Christian faith. Sixteen chapters show how Western culture and institutions have come to be the way they are as a result of Christianity. 
The review below was written in March 2014 for an informal book group.
Mangalwadi is an Indian Christian, and this gives the book its unique perspective. Only someone who is not a Westerner could have written much of what he says about the West without being immediately accused of bias and political incorrectness, and only an Indian could write what he writes about India without sounding neocolonialist.
M’s basic theme, which runs through the whole book, is that just about everyth…

A synopsis of C.S. Lewis' "The problem of pain"

Recently I found myself praying for a number of people who were either critically ill or who had lost loved ones through illness, and I decided it was time to (re)read C.S. Lewis's The problem of pain. At least, I thought I was rereading it. In the event, it seemed so unfamiliar that I wondered whether I had ever read it or whether I had simply forgotten what it said. 
The problem of pain is a more difficult read than some of Lewis's books, and I decided to write a synopsis for my own purposes. I give it here in case it is useful to someone else. But it is Inevitably a personal summary, and no real substitute for reading the book.